Centre for Media Research




Professorial Lecture Series. The Extraordinary Archive of Arthur J Munby: Photographing Class and Gender in the 19th Century, by Sarah Edge

Professor Sarah Edge’s lecture, given at the University of Ulster on 17th April 2013, is on her research into the archive of photographs compiled by Arthur J Munby ( 1828-1910) in the mid to late Victorian period (1859 to 1898). This archive holds Munby’s yearly diaries (64 filled volumes), his notebooks and sketches (12), letters and hundreds of photographs of working-class women. Created at the very moment when photography begins to succeed as a new form of mass communication this archive offers invaluable information on how Victorian Society came to use and understand the new invention of photograph.  The lecture returns to this period to pose pertinent questions (that have contemporary resonance in the digital age of photography) on what marks photography as a distinct form of communication and how it was ‘negotiated’ as an entirely new communicative medium.  The lecture also overturns the positioning of Munby as an ‘eccentric individual’ and amateur photographer by revealing that, with a few exceptions, his archive holds examples of the very first commercially produced photographs  of working-class women making it highly relevant to scholarship on Victorian urban culture. The lecture will be illustrated throughout with examples of these fascinating photographs.
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Sarah Edge is Professor of Photography and Cultural Studies at the University of Ulster, UK. She has a PhD from the University of Ulster, an MA in Art History from Leeds University and a BA in Fine Art from Portsmouth Polytechnic. She is a Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

Deleuze- available to view online

If you missed the symposium this weekend you can view the talks here or on our ustream channel (http://www.ustream.tv/channel/centre-for-media-research).

Apologies if the sound dips at the beginning of some of the talks – we did have a few issues but you can skip ahead. Pictures from the even are available from the Faculty of Arts facebook page (www.facebook.com/ulsterarts).

Video streaming by Ustream

Video streaming by Ustream

Video streaming by Ustream

Video streaming by Ustream

Deleuze and the Humanities at the CMR – live streaming

The Deleuze and the Humanities symposium on Saturday 3rd November at the University of Ulster will be streamed live on the internet. The event starts at 12pm on the Belfast Campus, Room B82D23 but can viewed by clicking here.

The one day event will bring together a range of Deleuze scholars to talk about the broad significance of his work from a variety of perspectives; feminism, performance studies, aesthetics, philosophy, politics, film studies, anthropology and cultural theory.

Among those presenting papers will be Dr. Patricia MacCormack (Anglia Ruskin University), the author of Cinesexuality (2008), and Dr. David Martin-Jones (University of St. Andrews), author of Deleuze and World Cinemas (2011).

Full details of the symposium can be downloaded here: Deleuze symposia

 

Deleuze and film @ the CMR

The contribution of Gilles Deleuze to film scholarship will be the topic of a paper given by Dr. David Martin-Jones of The University of Andrew’s at the CMR’s Deleuze and the Humanities symposium on 3rd November.

Dr. David Martin-Jones

As Dr. Martin-Jones explains, when Deleuze’s Cinema books first began to be discussed in Film Studies in the early 1990s, they received patchy entrenched opposition, balanced by a more general disinterest. This was due to numerous factors, the most significant being perhaps the “turn to history” which the discipline experienced in the early 1980s, and a backlash against the hegemony that film theory had held in the 1970s. But by the 2010s, the situation has changed dramatically, with a groundswell of interest in film-philosophy being fuelled in large part by the momentum gained by Deleuzian film scholarship. The growing interest is something that Dr. Martin-Jones has demonstrated through the online database Deleuzecinema.com which has users from over eighty countries.In his paper, Dr. Martin-Jones will explore two of the ways in which Deleuze provides a meaningful contribution to the discipline. Firstly he will explore the opportunity that a critique of Deleuze’s often Eurocentric conclusions provides for us to consider the aesthetic and cultural distinctiveness of different cinemas from around the world, in terms of their expression of time and movement. Then, in the context of the post-Cold War spread of contemporary world cinemas, he considers how Deleuze’s concept of the time-image can add an often-absent historical and geopolitical dimension to our understanding of ethics in cinema.Dr. Martin-Jones is the author of Deleuze, Cinema and National Identity (2006), Deleuze Reframed (with Damian Sutton, 2008), Scotland: Global Cinema (2009), Deleuze and World Cinemas (2011), and co-editor of Cinema at the Periphery (2010) and Deleuze and Film (2012). He is on the editorial boards of Deleuze Studies, Film-Philosophy and A/V: Journal of Deleuzian Studies, and he co-edits the Continuum monograph series Thinking Cinema.

The one day symposium will be held at University of Ulster’s Belfast Campus, York Street, in Room B82D23 at 12pm-7.30pm.

For further information contact Dr. Robert Porter at r.porter@ulster.ac.uk

Images of the post-conflict city: Belfast through Situationist spectacles

Situationism and the post-conflict city will the subject of a talk given by the CMR’s Dr. Robert Porter at the Huston School of Film and Digital Media in Galway on the 13th September. Dr. Porter will be joined by Belfast-based artist, Daniel Jewesbury, who will be exhibiting and talking about some of his own films. Together they have been investigating the space of ‘post-conflict’ Belfast for a number of years, seeking to develop a multi-disciplinary and comparativist methodology capable of critically engaging with the economic-political forces that shape the contemporary urban environment.

Daniel Jewesbury’s, an ‘old boy’ of the CMR, will show some of his recent film work, in particular NLR and Gilligan, explaining how he sees these films as dramatizing and critiquing the contemporary ‘post-conflict’ city.  Robert Porter will then open out the discussion by speculating how their collaborative research on Belfast can be productively described as ‘situationist’ in inspiration and, more importantly, in practice.

The talk starts at 2.30pm on Thursday 13th September in Main Room Huston School, National University of Ireland, Galway

For further information visit the Huston School website.

 

Deleuze and the Humanities @ the CMR

The contribution of Deleuze to the Humanities will be the subject of a one day symposium hosted by the Centre for Media Research. The event will bring together a range of Deleuze scholars to talk about the broad significance of his work from a variety of perspectives; feminism, performance studies, aesthetics, philosophy, politics, film studies, anthropology and cultural theory.

The symposium will consider the institutionalization of Deleuze within certain sectors of the academy, and the consequent authorial branding of Deleuze and Deleuze and Guattari within a burgeoning academic marketplace. These developments imply, or bring into focus, a range of related issues or problems for scholars working in the humanities. For those scholars who have not yet encountered Deleuze’s work, or those perhaps provoked or increasingly curious about how a Deleuzian metalanguage is being translated and used in their scholarly disciplines and forms of practice, the most immediate question may simply be; ‘why Deleuze’?

Among those presenting at the symposium are Dr. Patricia MacCormack (Anglia Ruskin University), the author of Cinesexuality (2008), and Dr. David Martin-Jones (University of St. Andrews), author of Deleuze and World Cinemas (2011)

The symposium will take place on Saturday 3rd November, at the University of Ulster’s Belfast campus in Room B82D23 at 12pm-7.30pm.

For further details contact Dr. Robert Porter: r.porter@ulster.ac.uk